stephanie jaye evans stephanie jaye evans
stephanie jaye evans
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Book Clubs


If your book club or reading group decides to read Faithful Unto Death or Safe From Harm, please let me know, because I would be deeply honored. I've gotten to visit with lots of book clubs that meet within driving distance. If your book club isn't in driving distance, maybe we could meet together via Skype. I'd be happy to answer any questions.


Safe From Harm
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Safe From Harm

Safe From Harm

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  1. Bear makes a judgment call on Phoebe almost as soon as he sees her, and that's largely based on her appearance. Is a person's appearance (dress, physical embellishments) intended to send a message? Is Bear reasonable in his assessment of Phoebe?
  2. Does the church overreact to the sleepover incident? What would have been the best way to handle the situation?
  3. What, if anything, is Lizabeth guilty of?
  4. More than one character in Safe From Harm takes justice into their own hands. How does that turn out? If the law does not cover a misdeed, is it ever appropriate to act as judge and jury?
  5. Are we responsible for the unintended consequences of our acts?
  6. How is the role of the church portrayed in the novel?
  7. What could Bear have done to have averted the tragedy? How should he have behaved differently?

Faithful Unto Death
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Faithful Unto Death

Faithful Unto Death

Download a pdf version of the questions

  1. Bear Wells seems less positive in his faith than many fictional clergymen—does this indicate a lack of faith on his part?
  2. Wanderley changes the way the other teens see Emma Tilton when he approaches her at church—could that happen, could one person make that much of a difference?
  3. Bear could be seen as willfully in denial about his daughter Jo's reading disability—how realistic is that for an educated man?
  4. Bear narrates the story and he often goes off topic and talks about his thoughts and feelings—sometimes about related subjects, sometimes not related at all. Does this enhance the story for you or does it slow it down?
  5. Many readers comment that they didn't guess who the killer was. Did the writer play fair? Looking back, were the clues there?
  6. Dr. Fallon, the antagonist in Faithful Unto Death, protests that he never intended to kill Graham Garcia, and that he thought Graham was dead when he left him—is Dr. Fallon a murderer or is he guilty of manslaughter?
  7. Faithful Unto Death is set in an affluent Master-planned community—not a usual setting for a crime novel. Does the setting work for or against the story? Are there ties to the village mysteries of Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers?
  8. Does the ending of the book feel complete to you? Have people changed? Has Bear changed at all?